Obama’s Health Care 2009

It’s been several months since I typed anything related to health care. Honestly, there truly hasn’t been anything new to write about, but also because I was waiting until the historic moment when our Senators and Congressman made fools of themselves and passed this forest-killing universal health care bill. Not only did they do it in high profile fashion as both were passed on Saturday nights, right about the time Saturday Night Live was beginning (fitting, don’t you think?)

The behemoth spewed from the bowels of congress, late in the weekend evenings of November 2009, is a mere 2077 pages long.  Small by Federal standards and still much, much less than the current tax code (the tax code is actually more than 13,000 pages and 22 volumes).  But give it time.   At the rate that Washington produces garbage, the health care bill will catch up very quickly to the tax code, and make about as much sense.  Of course, 2077 pages is way too much to digest and report here in one post, so I’ve decided to review the entire Bill in more easily managed “tidbits”.  Over the course of the next several weeks, I’ll take a look at the Bill in sections, and hopefully make it though all 2077 pages.  No small feat, but I’m sure that I’ll make it through the entire Bill before Congress produces one more document about healthcare and, after I finish, I’ll have read the entire Bill.  I doubt that any member of Congress has done that yet.

And yet, most Americans simply want healthcare.  Free or cheap, inexpensive or provided by work, the government, whomever.  They just want healthcare.  While we do have “universal” healthcare now, it is expensive and inconvenient for those who choose to take advantage of this “free” option.  Most middle school children will tell you that what is needed is something universal, affordable, simple, accessible, and for whatever my two cents is worth, easy to administer.   Clearly, Congress must need to go back to middle school and pare down their 2077 pages.  Harrison’s textbook of Medicine, the bible for Internal Medicine physicians, is only 2754 pages in length and encompasses ALL of Internal Medicine. The health care bill contains nothing specific, is full of generalities and may not even survive in its current form to make it into law.

I’m afraid that what will emerge is an inefficient health care program, providing less coverage, greater expense, more bureaucracy and an enormous national debt that even our grandchildren will not be able to repay.

Doc B.

My opinion is free.
Advice is worth exactly what you pay for it.

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